Led by China, Trade Deficit Falls in 2019

February 10, 2020

https://www.bea.gov/system/files/2020-02/trad1219.pdf

As reported by the Commerce Department on Thursday, America’s trade deficit in goods and services fell in 2019 for the first time in six years.  Trade in goods fell for the first time since 2016.  The decline was due entirely to the reduction of imports from China as a result of the tariffs put in place by the Trump administration.

The trade deficit in goods in 2019 fell to $853 billion from $875 billion in 2018. The decrease was led by a huge decrease in the deficit with China, which fell to $345.6 billion from $419.5 billion in 2018.  The trade deficit with China was the lowest since 2015.  Even more encouraging, the trade deficit in goods with China fell for the 5th consecutive month in December to $24.8 billion.  Imports from China fell by $87 billion in 2019.

Last month, the Trump administration signed the “Phase 1” trade deal with China, which rolled back some tariffs on Chinese imports in exchange for Chinese promises to boost imports of American goods.  The deal had been in the works for months.  If the Chinese wanted to demonstrate enthusiasm for this deal, they certainly didn’t show it in December.  The Chinese promised to increase their purchases of American goods in four different categories, using their 2017 imports as a baseline.  In 2020 they are to increase their purchase of American manufactured goods from $88.2 billion in 2017 to $121.1 billion this year.  They ended 2019 with purchases of $88.4 billion.

They promised to increase their purchases of American energy exports to $27.6 billion this year from $9.1 billion in 2017.  They ended 2019 with purchases of only $3.6 billion.

They promised to increase their purchases of American agricultural products to $36.5 billion this year from $24.0 billion in 2017.  They ended 2019 with purchases of only $10.2 billion.

And they promised to increase their purchases of American services.  That data hasn’t been released yet.

China needs to ramp up its purchases of American goods dramatically, beginning with the month just ended.  Did they?  We won’t know until next month when the January trade data is released.  Personally, I doubt that we’ll see much increase from China, if any.  They’ve already signaled that they think the coronavirus outbreak should give them a pass.  Trump will be a fool if he lets China get away with reneging on this deal.

Next month I’ll begin reporting on China’s monthly progress in meeting the terms of this deal.  I’ll also be keeping a close eye on the balance of trade with Mexico, now that the USMCA agreement has been signed into law.  I’m extremely skeptical of both of these agreements.  The only way to achieve a balance of trade with such densely populated nations is through the use of tariffs.  Such nations would never willingly agree to any deal that endangers their surplus of trade with the U.S.  But they’ll agree to any deal that forestalls the implementation of tariffs because it simply buys them more time for business as usual.

Time will tell, beginning next month.

 


China Already Weaseling Out of Trade Commitments

February 5, 2020

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-health-usa-supply/white-house-adviser-says-china-virus-to-delay-u-s-export-surge-from-trade-deal-idUSKBN1ZY1SD

As reported in the above-linked article, China has already begun to weasel out of the commitments it made in the “Phase 1” trade deal, signed only two weeks ago.  They’re blaming the coronavirus outbreak and citing a clause in the deal that provides for relief in the event of a “natural disaster or other unforeseeable event.”  And it seems that the Trump administration is buying it.

Give me a break.  At the time of this writing, approximately 500 people in China have died as a result of this new virus.  Compare that to the approximately 50,000 people who have died this season from the flu in China.  Ten million people die every year in China from one cause or another.  Remember that this is a country of 1.4 billion people, and we’re to believe that 500 deaths have rendered them unable to meet their trade commitments?  Do people in China eat less or otherwise consume less because of this outbreak?

Only two weeks into the trade deal, and China is already proving that it never had any intention of complying.  Rather, it was just a ploy to buy some time and tariff relief, in just exactly the same way that every other trade commitment it has ever made was merely a ploy to make the U.S. shut up and go away.  It seems to be working again.


Is the “Phase 1” trade deal with China a bad deal?

January 20, 2020

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-details-factbox/whats-in-the-u-s-china-phase-1-trade-deal-idUSKBN1ZE2IF

The above-linked Reuters article provides a breakdown in basic terms of what’s included in the “Phase 1” trade deal with China.  To make it easier to understand – and in preparation for tracking progress – I’ve created this spreadsheet, which shows what China has agreed to in terms of boosting its imports from the U.S.  Phase 1 China Trade Deal.

In addition, China agreed to:

… stronger Chinese legal protections for patents, trademarks, copyrights, including improved criminal and civil procedures to combat online infringement, pirated and counterfeit goods.

…  follow through on previous pledges to eliminate any pressure for foreign companies to transfer technology to Chinese firms

… refrain from directly supporting outbound investment aimed at acquiring foreign technology

… refrain from competitive currency devaluations

China’s retaliatory Dec. 15 tariffs, including a 25% tariff on U.S.-made autos, have been suspended.

So what did the U.S. give up in return?

… will cut by half the tariff rate it imposed on Sept 1. on a $120 billion list of Chinese goods, to 7.5%.

Tariffs that were scheduled to go into effect on Dec. 15 on nearly $160 billion worth of Chinese goods, including cellphones, laptop computers, toys and clothing, are suspended indefinitely.

That’s the deal in a nutshell.  On the surface, it sounds like a good deal, boosting exports by $200 billion per year.  But don’t be fooled.  This deal rolls back some existing tariffs and suspends new tariffs – tariffs that were making rapid progress toward restoring a balance of trade with China – in exchange for nothing more than promises, and China has a long history of breaking its trade promises.  China got exactly what it wanted – time – more time to continue business as usual.

With this deal, the U.S. is once again trying to export its way out of its massive trade deficit.  It’s similar to the vow that Obama made in January of 2010 to double export within five years.  It didn’t happen.  Not even close.  It’s impossible to export your way out of a trade deficit with nations whose gross over-crowding makes them utterly dependent on manufacturing for export to sustain their bloated labor forces.  And that’s China, among others.

Aside from their promise to boost imports, that promise about protecting intellectual property has been made many times before.  It’s untrackable and meaningless.  And currency manipulation?  The data proves that trade deficits have nothing to do with currency valuation.

The only hope is that the Trump administration will be more diligent than previous administrations in holding China’s feet to the fire, returning to the use of tariffs when China fails to meet its commitments.  China’s betting they won’t, and that future administrations will roll over like previous administrations.

I’ll begin tracking China’s progress on meeting its import commitments (or lack thereof) beginning with the January trade data, which isn’t released until March.