EU Scared to Death by Trump’s Tariff Threat

July 5, 2018

Precisely as I recommended he do in response to EU (European Union) tariffs on Harley-Davidson motorcycles, President Trump has threatened to impose stiff tariffs on European auto imports.  In return, the EU responded much like the cartoon cockroaches in the RAID insect killer commercials – full blown panic.  The end of the world is at hand!  Their world, for sure, but they want you to believe it’ll be the end of yours too.  Prices will rise, they say.  Sales will decline.  So too will GDP (gross domestic product), a measure of the overall U.S. economy.

Perhaps their most interesting warning was in regards to BMW production at their Spartanburg, SC plant that produces their SUV models.  (They call them “SAVs”, or “Sports Activity Vehicles.”)  They claim that most of the cars made there are exported, and it’s true.  As other nations respond with their own tariffs on American cars, they say, exports of those American-made BMW SUVs will decline and production will be cut, costing jobs.

Let’s look at the facts.  That Spartanburg BMW plant does export about 75% of the vehicles it builds, with those exports having a value of about $10 billion.  Is it really the loss of those BMW exports the EU is worried about, or is it something else?

Here are some more facts.  In 2017, Germany exported approximately $30 billion worth of cars and parts to the U.S., while importing only about $10 billion from the U.S., resulting in a $20 billion surplus for Germany.  The EU as a whole enjoyed a surplus of $44.1 billion in cars and parts with the U.S.

So what is the EU worried about most?  The American economy and BMW’s $10 billion in exports, or their $44.1 billion surplus?  The answer is obvious.  They’re making a killing in the U.S. market, and Trump’s tariffs threaten to put an end to it,

And it’s not just the EU.  Other globalist organizations have used similar scare tactics.  General Motors made similar warnings, but are they more worried about domestic auto sales or their China operations?

Every day, the news is filled with stories about how trade war fears are weighing on global markets.

Will car prices go up?  Probably.  But they didn’t mention to you that your wages will rise faster.  Will car sales decline?  No, the opposite will happen.  Sales of American-made models will rise faster than the decline in sales of EU cars as Americans grow more prosperous and opt for the less expensive American cars over the tariff-laden EU imports.

So don’t fall for the Chicken Little scare tactics.  It’s impossible for the U.S. to do anything but win a trade war, since a trade deficit is what defines a loser in global trade and the U.S. has the biggest deficit by far.  Anything that reduces that deficit makes America the winner.

If raising tariffs on imports were going to hurt the U.S. economy, then how do you explain that the economy is on a tear, putting up the best numbers in a long time – especially in the manufacturing sector of the economy?  Investors seem to understand.  While foreign markets – especially in Asia – have been taking a beating in the past few months, American markets are holding just below their record highs.  Like the saying goes – money talks and BS walks.  The big money knows that Trump’s tariff plan is good news for the American economy.

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/04/eu-considering-international-talks-to-cut-car-tariffs-report-says.html

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Harley-Davidson’s Response to EU Tariffs

June 27, 2018

In response to European Union (EU) tariffs on Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Harley-Davidson announced on Monday that it would shift production of its motorcycles for the EU market overseas in order to avoid $90-100 million in tariffs.  (It wasn’t clear if it planned to move production to the EU or somewhere else.)  The tariffs imposed by the EU were in response to the Trump administration’s tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.  In addition to the tariffs on Harley-Davidson motorcycles, the EU also imposed tariffs on Kentucky bourbon and Levi’s jeans.  (Apparently, the EU isn’t aware that Levis are no longer made in the U.S.)

In response to Harley’s announced move, Trump attacked Harley-Davidson on Tuesday:  https://www.reuters.com/article/us-harley-davidson-tariffs/trump-threatens-harley-davidson-over-european-production-move-idUSKBN1JM1AF.

So what does this all mean?  Is this proof that tariffs don’t work, as free-trade advocates claim?  Hardly.  It is proof, however, that in order to be effective, tariffs must be applied across-the-board to all of the manufactured products from the country or region in question.  Rather that attack Harley-Davidson, the president’s next move should be a reciprocal (or larger) tariff on all motorcycle imports from the EU.  No more BMW’s.  No more Triumphs or Nortons or Ducatis.

Harley-Davidson has a right to move production overseas, just like the above-mentioned EU motorcycle manufacturers would then have a right to move production to the U.S. to avoid its tariffs.  Better yet, Harley-Davidson would suddenly find itself in a better position to begin manufacturing motorcycles in the U.S. to compete in those segments of the market.  Harley-Davidson would come out the winner, and EU motorcycle manufacturers would be the losers.  Net employment in motorcycle manufacturing would actually rise in the U.S.

No doubt, the EU would respond with more tariffs on U.S. products, though it’d be hard-pressed to find ones that it imports from the U.S. in greater measure than it exports.  But why wait for that?  Let’s hit them where it really hurts and put a 25% tariff on EU auto exports.  No more VW’s.  No more Mercedes Benzes.  No more Audis, Jaguars, Land Rovers, Fiats, Alfa Romeos and Volvos.

The EU will respond with tariffs on U.S. auto imports, you might say.  What imports?  Imports of American cars to the EU are virtually non-existent.  Oh, there are a few, but they’re dwarfed by European imports into the U.S.  The net result would be soaring employment in the U.S. auto industry as American consumers shunned the now-more expensive European imports.

Come on, President Trump.  You’re off to a good start in fixing our trade mess.  It’s time to go “all in” and apply tariffs across-the-board on all European imports.  When you’re done with that, you can have an even bigger impact in Asia.


America’s Biggest Trade Surpluses in Manufactured Goods in 2017

June 9, 2018

In previous posts we examined lists of America’s biggest trade deficits, both in terms of sheer size and on a per capita basis, and found that both lists were dominated by nations with very high population densities.  If population density is a factor in driving trade imbalances, then we should see the same but opposite effect at the other end of the spectrum.  If we look at America’s biggest trade surpluses in manufactured goods, we should find the list dominated by nations with low population densities.  Here’s the list:  Top 20 Surpluses, 2017.

On this list we find that there are actually two factors at play.  First of all, the list is dominated by nations with lower population densities.  Eleven of these twenty nations are less densely populated than the U.S.  (On the list of our biggest deficits, only two nations were less densely populated.)  Only six nations on the list are significantly more densely populated than the U.S.  The average population density of the nations on this list is 209 people per square mile.  Compare that to the average for our biggest deficits – 734 people per square mile.  And if we calculated the population density of this group of twenty nations taken together – the total population divided by the total land mass – we find a population density of only 34 people per square mile, compared to a population density of 509 people per square mile on the list of the biggest deficits.

Still, how do we explain the presence on this list of some nations with some very high population densities?  Of those six nations that are significantly more densely populated than the U.S., three – United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Qatar – are net oil exporters.  As such, it’s almost automatic that we will have a trade surplus in manufactured goods with such nations, regardless of their population density.  Why?  Because oil is priced in American dollars which can only be used to purchase things from America.  Even if the U.S. itself buys little or no oil from such countries, the countries who do must still pay in American dollars.  Strange, I know, but that’s how it is.  The end result is that oil exporters buy American products, either for their own consumption or for re-export to other nations.

That leaves three nations – the Netherlands, Belgium and Ecuador – unexplained.  The Netherlands and Belgium are tiny, adjoining nations who together enjoy the only deep water sea port on the Atlantic coast of Europe.  They use this to their advantage, making themselves into major points of entry for imports from America and for their distribution to the rest of Europe.  So their presence on the list is more of a geographic anomaly than anything else.

At number one on the list, Canada is both very sparsely populated while also being a huge oil exporter.  In fact, they are America’s biggest source of imported oil.  This is why the surplus with Canada is more than three times the size of our next largest surplus.  The U.S. has no better trade partner than Canada – hands down.  While I give Trump high marks for taking on the trade issue, I wish he’d find a way to exempt Canada from tariffs.  Canada has a legitimate beef regarding these tariffs.  Canada is not the problem.

By the way, does it come as a surprise to see Russia on the list?  It’s less surprising when you look at their population density.

Also, take a look at the Purchasing Power Parity (PPP, roughly analogous to wages) of the nations on this list.  The average PPP is just under $40,000 per capita.  The average of the nations on the list of our biggest deficits was $35,000 – a difference of only 15%.  The difference in population density between these two lists is 1400%.  Which do you think is more likely to be the real driver of trade imbalances – wages or population density?

As was the case with our list of the biggest trade deficits, the list of our biggest trade surpluses is also populated with very large and very tiny nations.  In order to factor sheer size out of the picture, let’s next take a look at our biggest trade surpluses expressed in per capita terms.  Stay tuned for the next post.


U.S. Employment Picture Darkening?

May 9, 2018

There was a lot of hoopla that accompanied the April employment report, released last Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The economy added another 164,000 jobs and the unemployment rate fell to 3.9% – the lowest rate since December of 2000.  Much discussion ensued in the media over the effects of “full employment.”  Will there now be upward pressure on wages, prompting the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates?  Where will employers find the workers they need?  Will the shortage of labor constrain economic growth?

Less notice was taken of some not-so-rosy news in the report.  Wages rose less than expected – only 0.1%.  The labor force participation rate fell by 0.1%.  And literally no one took notice of some even darker news in the report.  The employment level (from the household survey) rose by only 3,000 after falling by 37,000 in March.  And the civilian labor force has fallen by nearly 400,000 over the past two months, reversing much of the spike that occurred in February, and contributing to the drop in unemployment.  Without that decline in the labor force, unemployment would actually have risen by two tenths over the past two months.

In fact, per capita employment has risen only twice in the past seven months – a two-month spike that occurred in January/February – and remains at exactly the same level as in September.  And the number of unemployed has actually risen slightly.

The fact is that there remains a lot of slack in the labor force.  An accurate reading of unemployment – one that grows the labor force along with growth in the population (instead of erasing people from the labor force if they give up looking for work) – has unemployment at 6.8% and U6 unemployment (a less reported measure that includes discouraged workers) at 12.0%.  This Reuters article, contrary to the title of the article, admits as much – that the job market is “hot” only if you don’t count all the people who have been left behind.

The current expansion is among the longest ever and brought national unemployment to an 18-year low. Yet over 6.3 million are still out of work, many of them clustered in cities with chronic, high unemployment.

6.3 million people is the number that were unemployed before the “Great Recession” of 2008.  It doesn’t even count the additional 5 million people who still haven’t been put back to work since then.

None of this is surprising.  Though the Trump administration is making moves in the right direction with the process of renegotiating NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement), with the imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum, and with threats of a trade war with China, there has yet to be much in the way of meaningful results.  Our trade deficit is as bad as ever.  Further delay in progress on trade will risk a return to a stagnating economy.


Red China Runnin’ Scared

April 18, 2018

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-eu-exclusive/exclusive-china-seeks-trade-firewall-with-u-s-allies-in-rush-of-ambassador-meetings-sources-idUSKBN1HO1Y0

It all began with Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum.  Red China responded with tariffs on about $3 billion of American exports.  Trump upped the ante with a proposal for tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports.  Red China responded in kind, including tariffs on American soybeans, and they promptly began buying their soybeans from Brazil.  No dummies, the Brazilians.  They raised their prices.  And the EU, now unable to buy from Brazil, placed big orders for American soybeans.  No skin off the noses of American soybean farmers.

Trump then responded with a proposal for tariffs on another $100 billion of imports from Red China, whose tit-for-tat strategy was now exhausted since they import so little from the U.S.  Instead, they threatened severe retaliation in some form that remains unspecified.  But their rhetoric was threatening.  Not Islamist “rivers of blood running through your cities” threatening, but scary enough to those who don’t really understand international trade.

Now it’s looking a whole lot like a bluff.  As reported in the above-linked article, the Chinese are now running scared, trying to drum up support for “free trade” (their version of it) with the EU (European Union).

Some of the western diplomats involved in the meetings with Fu Ziying, who is also a vice-commerce minister, have viewed the approaches as a sign of how anxious Beijing is getting about the expanding conflict with Washington, the sources said.

The rush of meetings last Thursday and Friday with ambassadors from France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, and the European Union, may be a signal that China is trying to build a firewall against Trump’s aggressive trade measures, the severity of which some foreign diplomats said Beijing had miscalculated.

“China is showing confidence, but internally they appear quite concerned. They have apparently underestimated Trump’s resolve on trade,” the diplomat said, adding that Beijing is nervous about China’s major trading partners siding with Washington.

It’s not likely they’re getting much sympathy from the EU.  In 2016, the EU had a $175 billion trade deficit with Red China.  If anything, the EU is probably realizing that America’s new get tough policy has Red China running scared and, just maybe, they ought to try a little of that tariff medicine themselves.


Red China Fires Back, but Now Low on Ammo

April 4, 2018

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china/china-retaliates-slaps-duties-on-u-s-soybeans-planes-markets-skid-idUSKCN1HB0G6

As reported in the above-linked article, Red China has now matched Trump dollar-for-dollar with tariffs on American exports in the escalating “trade war.”  But now it finds itself critically low on “ammo.”  If Trump responds with tariffs on another $50 billion of Chinese imports, Red China will be able to match those tariffs again.  But then they’re done.  Trump could continue to slap tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese imports eight more times and Red China would be unable to respond because there would be no more American exports to attack.  That’s how bad the trade imbalance is and why Red China has such a losing hand.

In spite of Wall Street getting its panties in a wad over this situation, there’s really nothing to fear.  So Chinese goods become more expensive.  So what?  Americans then have a choice.  Spend more money to get them or use their money for something else.  For example, suppose Apple iPhone X’s go up in price from $1,000 to $1,250.  Maybe it’ll be just the catalyst Americans have needed to ponder whether all the money they spend on these gadgets is money well-spent.  Given the high cost of the phones and the contracts for data plans, and given that social media has now been exposed as a scheme for mining away your privacy, maybe the money would be better spent on other things, like homes and cars, for example.  The point is that less money spent on Chinese imports is money now available for spending on other things.  The impact on the U.S. economy will be a positive one – not a negative.

What Trump needs to do is take this trade war to the next level.  He needs to apply tariffs across the board to every Chinese import.  Beyond that, he needs to take on our other big trade deficits with the likes of the European Union, Japan, Mexico and a few others.  Any country that has a sustained trade surplus with the U.S. needs to be in his cross-hairs but, at the same time, he needs to lower barriers for our good trade partners like Canada, Australia, most all of South America, and others.  This isn’t a war against trade.  It’s a war for balanced trade – a war from which we should never have withdrawn.


Trump Wins Major Concessions from South Korea in Deal Revamp

March 27, 2018

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-03-25/south-korea-says-agreement-made-with-u-s-on-trade-deal-tariffs

As reported in the above-linked article, the Trump administration has won major concessions from South Korea in exchange for exempting them from the steel tariffs.  South Korea agreed to:

  1. A quota on their steel exports to the U.S. that cuts those exports by 30%.
  2. Double the quota for American car imports from the current maximum of 50,000 cars to 100,000 cars.  (Although it’s not likely that they’ll actually import that many.)
  3. Allow the U.S. to extend its tariffs on trucks by 20 years until the year 2041.  (The U.S. has always maintained a 25% tariffs on truck imports.)

That last item is a big concession by the Koreans, since Hyundai and Kia were geared up to introduce pickups into the U.S. in 2021.  This effectively kills those plans.

The U.S. – Korea trade deal, known as “Kotus,” was negotiated by the Obama administration and signed in 2012.  That year, our trade deficit with S. Korea was $16.6 billion.  In 2017, the deficit was $22.9 billion.  Obama had hailed the deal as a “big win for American workers,” but it proved to be exactly the opposite.

These concessions by Korea demonstrate just how deeply tariffs are feared, and how much power the U.S. can wield in trade negotiations with the threat of using them.  I hope that Trump is emboldened by this success and applies the same (or more) pressure on others, especially Red China.  I hope that this is only the beginning of restoring a balance of trade for the U.S.